Monday, March 4, 2013

Alcohol News - 9/2013


Reuters (Sweden) - In globalizing Sweden, state still big brother over drinking
Few CEOS would welcome news of a fall in sales. But Magdalena Gerger, head of Sweden's retail alcohol monopoly that is one of the world's biggest single buyers of wine, is one of them.
Iceland Review (Iceland) - Alcohol Sales up for First Time Since Crash
Alcohol sales in 2012 at Iceland’s state-owned liquor store Vínbúðin are up for the first time since the economic crisis in 2008. Sales, which totaled 18.5 million liters, increased by 0.54 percent compared to 2011 but were still 9 percent lower than in 2008.
YLE Uutiset (Finland) - EU approves Finnish drug aimed at curtailing alcohol abuse
The European Commission has given the green light for the sale of a medication intended to quench the urge for alcoholics to drink. The drug, Selincro, is produced by the Turku-based Biotie Therapies and marketed by the Danish pharmaceutical company Lundbeck.
VTI (Sweden) - Joint action against alcohol and drugs in traffic (SMADIT) – An interview study with suspected drunk drivers
SMADIT, Joint action against alcohol and drugs in traffic, is a method that is intended to reduce the number of repeated drunk driving offences.
Addiction - Alcohol—a universal preventive agent? A critical analysis
In observational studies, moderate drinking is associated with a reduced risk of more than twenty different diseases and health problems. However, it would be premature to conclude that there is a causal relationship.
The Conversation (Australia) - My drinking, your problem: alcohol hurts non-drinkers too
Drinking a lot of alcohol is bad for the drinker’s health, both in the short and in the long run. But drinking often affects others adversely, too. This is well recognised for drink driving, and once the size of the problem was established, policies were put in place that successfully drove down rates of drink-driving deaths and injuries.
Science Omega (UK) - Children in UK are more exposed to alcohol promotion than adults
Experts are calling for a complete ban on alcohol-related advertising and sponsorship in the United Kingdom after a study revealed that British children are more exposed to promotional campaigns than their parents.
Daily Mail - The truth behind 'beer goggles' - scientists claim our sexual desire is simply the last part of the brain to be hit by alcohol
It has always been said a few stiff drinks make the plainest face more inviting - but ‘beer goggles’ do not make us think people are more attractive than they are, experts have claimed.
Go Jamaica (Bermuda) - Bermuda children experimenting with alcohol and drugs – survey
A new survey has found that children as young as seven have experimented with drugs and alcohol in Bermuda.
The Herald (Canada) - Unhealthy drinking widespread around the world, CAMH study shows
A new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows that alcohol is now the third leading cause of the global burden of disease and injury, despite the fact most adults worldwide abstain from drinking.
CBS News (UK) - Study shows Brits underreport alcohol consumption by up to 60 percent
A British survey showed that the average man and woman underreported their weekly drinking consumption by as much as 60 percent.
Times of India (India) - 'Depressed youths often surrender to drugs, alcohol'
In the next two years, Bangalore will become the suicide capital of India, said Dr Ashok Pai, psychiatrist and director of Manasa Foundation (Shimoga).
Reuters - Alcohol counseling may aid domestic abuse therapy
For heavy drinkers in treatment for domestic violence problems, an extra therapy session targeting alcohol abuse may help to speed overall improvement in violent behavior, according to a new study.
Sydney Morning Herald (Australia) - Hospital slams AHA for 'denial' of alcohol problems
A BIG Sydney hospital has accused the Australian Hotels Association of misleading the public and mocking emergency staff by persistently denying the severity of alcohol-fuelled violence.
WFAA - 'It's a poison': Trend of inhaling alcohol vapors alarms doctors
Instead of doing shots for a quick buzz, people are inhaling their liquor to get high while also curbing their calorie intake.
The Age (Australia/UK) - Australian experts back British call for ad ban to curb alcohol harm
A complete ban on all alcohol advertising and sponsorship, a minimum price of 75¢ per unit of alcohol, requiring one-third of each alcohol label to be given to health warnings, and increasing taxes are some of the recommendations from the report, ''Health First: an evidence-based alcohol strategy for the UK''.
Times-Standard - Mothers' alcohol use linked to infant deaths
About one in six sudden infant deaths may be linked to their mothers' heavy alcohol use during or soon after pregnancy, according to a new study from Australia.
Herald Scotland (Scotland) - Demand for more radical action on cheap alcohol
THE Scottish Government has been urged to go further in its crackdown on cheap alcohol, by a group of health organisations demanding a radical strategy from Westminster and all the devolved administrations.
Irish Times (Ireland) - Minister warns over alcohol abuse
Minister of State for Health Alex White has said changes are required at community level if Ireland is to tackle alcohol abuse.
BBC News (UK) - Alcohol abuse's hidden world
The answer, on one level, is simple - you get drunk. But the science reveals a complicated series of reactions that lie behind drinking - between chemicals and neurons, genes and environment, people and society.
TheParliament.com (EU) - New report calls for 'positive' message on alcohol use
A new report has called for a radical shake up in alcohol advertising to combat a 'rising' number of underage drinkers. The report, published on Monday, questions the effectiveness of "focusing" on "negative" messages in prevention programmes.
Vancouver Sun (Canada) - Worldwide cost of drinking alcohol during pregnancy could be far higher than expected
The true number of children exposed to alcohol before birth is so poorly understood that the World Health Organization has launched an international study to count them.

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